Current Opportunities in the Department of Entomology

 

 

Graduate Assistantships on Pollinator Health

The Healy laboratory is currently seeking a graduate student (MS or PHD) interested in evaluating the epidemiology of deformed wing virus on honey bees.  This project will involve working in a team at LSU with partners from the USDA Honey Bee Research laboratory in Baton Rouge.  The goal of this study will be to evaluate different transmission dynamics of the virus to honey bees.

 

The Swale laboratory is currently seeking a PHD student to conduct physiology based studies evaluating the impacts of different stressors (pathogens, pesticides, mites, nutrition, climate) on honey bee health. This research will be in collaboration with partners from LSU and the USDA Honey Bee Research laboratory in Baton Rouge.

 

 

Graduate Assistantships on insects as indicators of marsh health

The Husseneder and Foil laboratories are currently seeking graduate students to be involved in current projects using insects as bioindicators of marsh health.  The greenhead saltmarsh horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus, is an integral part of the Spartina marsh ecosystem. Its larvae represent the top of the invertebrate food pyramid in the marsh soil. Population crashes after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill suggest that horse flies could serve as bioindicators of marsh health and toxic effects of oil intrusion.  Therefore, we study changes in population numbers, population genetic structure and the food web of horse flies in response to catastrophic events and recovery.  You can also visit our project website by clicking here.

 

 

Departmental Assistantships

The Department of Entomology often provides graduate assistantships to Masters and PHD students applying to the program.  Please look through our faculty websites to learn more about different faculty and programs in our department.

 

 

Research Associate/PostDoc positions evaluating insects as indicators of marsh health

The Husseneder and Foil laboratories are currently seeking personnel to be involved in current projects using insects as bioindicators of marsh health.  The greenhead saltmarsh horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus, is an integral part of the Spartina marsh ecosystem. Its larvae represent the top of the invertebrate food pyramid in the marsh soil. Population crashes after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill suggest that horse flies could serve as bioindicators of marsh health and toxic effects of oil intrusion.  Therefore, we study changes in population numbers, population genetic structure and the food web of horse flies in response to catastrophic events and recovery.  You can also visit our project website by clicking here.

 

 

Program leader for longitudinal studies on stressors of managed honey bees

The Healy and Swale laboratories are currently seeking a program leader to help coordinate a 3 year longitudinal study on stressors affecting the health of managed honey bees. Work is in collaboration with partners from LSU and the USDA Honey Bee Research Laboratory in Baton Rouge. Work will require frequent travel to pollination sites, including California, South Dakota, and Mississippi.  Experience working with honey bees is preferred.

 

 

 

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